Queen Bohemian Rhapsody Old School Computer Remix


One of the most well known songs around the world was born in the 1970s, but has had a rebirth decades later. Bohemian Rhapsody, by the band, Queen, was featured in films as well as other venues. It remains the quintessential rock ballad. A new use for yesterday’s classic computer components gives new life to the song. Periodically sounding much like something from the electronic music genius, Isao Tomita, this reworked method of portraying the song is simple in sound yet complex in nature- and without a keyboard.

Visualization gives added movement to the piece much like strumming a guitar or fingers flying along a keyboard. Some tones are more crass and seeing the graphic screen pulse those intense tones before softening into more mellow inflexible sound seems perfect to follow visually.

Components such as an old TI-99/4A and tape drive, 3.5 inch damaged hard drive, oscilloscopes, floppy drive, Adaptec 2940UW SCSI card, and Atari 800xl are the instruments producing the sounds. It took some looking around to find all the parts for the project. Searching the internet for items on ebay and craigslist produced some results, but spotting and rescuing components from a neighborhood trash pile completed the lot. All this sound for less than one hundred dollars is pretty impressive.

The musicianship is also impressive though. Timing of units for melodies and background grooves the song right up to head banging bliss. It’s a clever and imaginative way to utilize antiquated, and sometimes, broken electronics. It generates thoughts of electronic manipulation, musical ability, and fun thinking outside the box. Or in this case, maybe, within many boxes.

Written by Dan Petrovic

Dan Petrovic, the managing director of DEJAN, is Australia’s best-known name in the field of search engine optimisation. Dan is a web author, innovator and a highly regarded search industry event speaker. In addition to industry leadership, Dan also maintains an active academic life as an adjunct lecturer and the chairman of the Industry Advisory Board for the School of Marketing at Griffith University.


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